Titty Cactus



How to Start a Cactus Garden

Whether grown as houseplants or outdoors, cactus plants add plenty of interest to your home—especially when featured as a collection. Here's a brief guide to growing these easy-care plants.

There are numerous reasons to start a cactus garden. Do you love the intriguing and often otherworldly look of cacti and other succulents? Are you in search of relatively easy-care potted plants? Do you want to conserve water? Then these gardens are for you! Desert-dwellers are surprisingly versatile, and you'll find that there are nearly as many cactus decoration ideas as there are gardeners to design them.


Titty Cactus - garden

Accepted Scientific Name: Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Mart.) Console
Boll. Reale Orto Bot. Palermo 1897, 10.

Origin and Habitat: Garden origin (Nursery produced cultivar). The original natural habitat of this species is northern central Mexico down to Oaxaca.

Description: The standard Myrtillocactus geometrizans is a highly branched columnar candelabra like tree cactus that creates a dense growth of stems growing closely together. In nature grows up to 4.5 m tall, with the crown reaching up to 5 m in width.
Stems: Glaucous (blue grey) Up to 7-10 cm thick. They have 5-8 ribs that are approximately 2.5 cm in depth with areoles about 2.5 cm apart.
Spines: Each areole may have up to 5-9 spines, but generally they have 3-5 spines about 5-12 mm long. Some spines but not awful.
Flowers: Rather smaller (2.5-3.7 cm) in relation to stem, greenish white.
Blooming season: March. Starts blooming when it is about 60 cm tall.
Fruit: Very sweet, edible, dark red, oblong fruits 8-20 mm in diameter.
Remarks: There are several crested clones of Myrtillocactus geometrizans that have a tendency to fan out, some will form stable crests while others (the more common) just cluster over one another. Regardless, both types make for a spectacular landscape attraction.

Subspecies, varieties, forms and cultivars of plants belonging to the Myrtillocactus geometrizans group

Bibliography: Major references and further lectures
1) Edward Anderson “The Cactus family” Timber Press, Incorporated, 2001
2) James Cullen, Sabina G. Knees, H. Suzanne Cubey "The European Garden Flora Flowering Plants: A Manual for the Identification of Plants Cultivated in Europe, Both Out-of-Doors and Under Glass" Cambridge University Press, 11/Aug/2011
3) David R Hunt Nigel P Taylor Graham Charles International Cactaceae Systematics Group. "The New Cactus Lexicon" dh books, 2006
4) Urs Eggli, Leonard E. Newton: “Etymological Dictionary of Succulent Plant Names” Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg 2010
5) Christopher Brickell “RHS Encyclopedia of Plants and Flowers” Dorling Kindersley Ltd, 01/Sep/2010
6) Willy Cullmann, Erich Götz (Dozent Dr.), Gerhard Gröner “The encyclopedia of cacti” Timber Press, 1987
7) Gerhard Gröner, Erich Götz “Beautiful Cacti: A Basic Grower's Guide” Sterling, 1992
8) Hecht “BLV Handbuch der Kakteen” BLV-Verlagsgesellschaft, 1982
9) E Haustein “Der Kosmos Kakteenfuehrer (the Kosmos Cactus Guide)” Balogh Scientific Books, United States, 01/Dec/1998
10) Sánchez , E., Guadalupe Martínez, J., Hernández, H.M., Gómez-Hinostrosa, C. & Cházaro, M. 2013. Myrtillocactus geometrizans. In: IUCN 2013. "IUCN Red List of Threatened Species." Version 2013.2. . Downloaded on 28 April 2014.
11) Jules Janick, Robert E. Paull "The Encyclopedia of Fruit & Nuts" CABI, 2008
12) Clive Innes "Complete Handbook of Cacti and Succulents" Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, 01/dic/1981


- (Dinosaur Back Plant) is an interesting waxy blue cactus that forms a tree-like trunk which has a tendency to fan out clustering over one another. Occasionally, when new branches form out from a crest they may revert to the normal growth pattern, giving rise to a more bizarre appearance. Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Myrtillocactus geometrizans f. cristatus Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Myrtillocactus geometrizans f. cristatus Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Myrtillocactus geometrizans f. cristatus Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli

Myrtillocactus geometrizans

Myrtillocactus geometrizans (bilberry cactus, whortleberry cactus or blue candle) is a species of cactus in the genus Myrtillocactus, native to central and northern Mexico. [1]

Myrtillocactus geometrizans is a large shrubby cactus growing to 4–5 m tall, with candelabra-like branching on mature plants. The individual stems are 6–10 cm diameter, with five (occasionally six) ribs, with areoles spaced 1.5–3 cm apart. The flowers are creamy white, 2–2.5 cm diameter. The fruit is an edible dark purple berry 1–2 cm diameter, superficially resembling Vaccinium myrtillus (bilberry or whortleberry) fruit both the scientific and English names derive from this resemblance. [2]

It is a popular species in cultivation, where young plants commonly remain unbranched for many years. The fruit is edible, and sold for consumption in Mexico. [2]

The bilberry cactus is fast growing, and is often used as grafting stock because of this. With favourable conditions it can reach heights of up to 15 feet. [3]

The fukurokuryuzinboku( 福禄竜神木 ) cultivar from Japan, commonly known as "titty cactus" or "breast cactus," has unusually plump ribs shaped like human breasts. [4] Fukurokuryuzinboku, roughly translates to fortune (fuku), fief/happy (roku), dragon (ryu), Shinto god/spirit (jin), tree (boku). [5] It was named after Fukurokuju and Ryujin, two of the Seven Lucky Gods in Japanese mythology.


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